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Posts Tagged ‘Carl Zeiss’

Pics: Nokia N8 Photo Samples

June 22, 2010 10 comments

[update; More samples here and here]

Here are some sample photos by the Nokia N8 uploaded by Camb078 (the more colourful photos) and apyykko.

The one below is a full 9MP image. According to the Exif (image data) this was taken at 10pm with the Jenga photo around 11pm. PM?

Crop of the chair (with MS paint so artefacts most likely gained). This is from a 9MP image, you would have gotten more to work with of course cropping from 12MP but for me, I prefer these 16:9 shots made for viewing in widescreen.

apyykko’s photos are probably just every day photos (NOT ‘artsy’ photos like NokConv’s samples designed to show case the camera capabilities by composing a shot that make the subject more interesting)

That said, I’d really love to see how a photographer or budding enthusiast would push the N8.

I mean, just take a look at what Ralph Higgo does with the Nokia N97.

We first wrote about Ralph in our post prior to N8 launch in April:

“Ode to Nokia N82′s successor – the upcoming Nokia camera phone king; killer of the digicam.”

For the most beautiful photography, the biggest determining factor is the eye and talent behind the lens. That’s not to say any phone camera will do. Nokia CZ Cam phones have great picture quality and so much versatility compared to its rivals. JeeBus phone is only just getting freakin digital zoom this summer!

The potential of these Nokia devices as tools for serious photography is showcased by the phenomenal work of professional commercial photographer, RALPH HIGGO who is based in Cape Town, South Africa.  His portfolio on myphotographer.posterous.com using just the Nokia N97 (yes N97!) is absolutely unbelievable

Where camera phones win over digital cameras and even bulky D-SLRs is that they’re always with you. In your pocket. When an unpredicted, beautiful scene presents itself to you out of the blue, you won’t have time to go back home for your camera. But as mentioned, you’ll want to maximise getting those great spontaneous photos by having a great camera phone.

The Xenon flash gives more situations where the N8 can be useful, being able to capture your friends in low light and freeze the action into digital memory. You can see a demo of N8 with and without xenon flash here, (as well as samples of how well N82 performed against LED rivals)

apyykko

Camera flash test: Nokia N86 vs Nokia N82 vs Nokia N97 vs Samsung i8910

August 11, 2009 4 comments

James Burland from Nokia Creative has been putting the N86 (from Steve Litchfield) under a few tests. In his latest post, he checks out extreme low light performance using the built in Dual LED flash (which Nokia claims is “70% more powerful than previous Dual LED solutions”), and compares it with:

  • the might Xenon of the N82
  • another Dual LED wielding N97
  • single LED of the Samsung i8910

cam

[testing how much light the respective flash puts out]

I had expected the N82 to win, and not surprisingly it did. What is surprising though is how close the N86 came using it’s latest generation dual LED and those improved optics. Imagine just how much better it could have been if it had Xenon? User reports on the N86 show that although it is very close to illuminating scenes like the N82, it cannot freeze shots like the N82 can.

Though the N86 isn’t the winner in terms of flash, it does have the undisputed title for best low light photos WITHOUT flash. As great as simply sticking Xenon would be to a generic 8MP camera, your low light image quality will suffer when you go beyond the distant limits of your flash. The N86 has superior optics to any of the previous Nseries line that gives it the upper hand in taking in all the available illumination of its surroundings. Even better is the wide angle lens that lets you get a lot more of the subject into the frame.

Via Nokia Creative

Other N86 camera tests include:

FD

[Wide Angle lens gets more of the scene into the frame.When the N82 doesn’t wash out the picture, the colours are much more vibrant, but otherwise, the N86 produces results that are more pleasing to the eye.]

On the subject of N82 Xenon Tests, here’s a post with the N82 versus N97.

Damien’s comments over at Nokia Conversations are really interesting to read. He points out (the official reason) why Nokia’s gone the Dual LED route and not xenon. Basically the issue seems to be space. Nokia wanted to create a good all rounder phone, with the best performance for the given space.N86’s dual LED illuminates a scene quite well, but also doubles up as being a usable video light.

Nokia apparently doesn’t just want to be ticking boxes. i.e. Xenon – check.

“There is a certain amount of space for a lighting solution in the product. For that space which provides the greatest amount of illumination? For the space available in a mobile device LED is now very close to xenon.

I have seen some xenon handsets (which will remain nameless) provide a ‘tick box’ solution. In other words, yes it says xenon on the box but the flash tube and capacitors are so small that the output is less than I have seen even from older generation dual LED solutions. So it’s the real performance that matters, not just what it says on the box,”

Hmm – so be weary. Just because a handset advertises Xenon, doesn’t mean it performs as well as you’d expect from a Xenon Flash. Same goes for advertising video light – it may be there but it might be so crap you can only film subjects 20 cm away.

“mobile device LED is now very close to xenon”. Close, but not close enough. The occasions where you actually do need flash, dual LED won’t cut it. Having decent implementation of Xenon would have given it the edge in being able to capture a photo in ALL situations.

As for the N86, I can sort of accept the reasoning of “space” as to why Nokia went the Dual LED route. It’s a compact, good all rounder, and Dual LED was the best lighting solution for the space available.

But I’m less understanding of why they didn’t include Xenon (or even this new breed of Dual LED) for their flagship that is the N97. The N97 was already a relatively large/thick phone. If the key aim is performance, any added size that would change its camera from being a wishy washy cameraphone to being a reliable all situation camera is definitely worth it.

It would have been an ideal combination – big 3.5″ – the “old 5MP” that didn’t have low light improvements of the N86 – it was screaming for Xenon. But Nokia chose to make compromises (and in the case of the N97 it was making the wrong cuts in terms of best possible performance…e.g. RAM)

hmmm.. Nokia Mantra  “We make so many devices…we’ll just put that in our next phone”. 😛

Future Devices: Xenon coming back to Nokia

Last quotes from Damien which may hint at future devices.

Does this mean Nokia doesn’t understand the benefits of xenon? No.

Does this mean Nokia will never introduce a product with xenon flash? No.

Without being familiar with our future product plans I would encourage you not to make any other conclusions other than does the N86 8MP fit your needs. If it does, then I’m very happy. If not I’ll understand. Maybe we have something in the future or elsewhere in our portfolio which will be more appropriate for you.

Perhaps the rumoured 12MP Nokia with Xenon?

Nokia N97 Camera Test

June 9, 2009 4 comments

James Burland of Nokia Creative is putting the Nokia N97 (which he helped his work colleague win from the Search for N… contest) through a series of rigorous tests.

Notice in the colour shots how much more vibrant the colours are from the N97 than the N95 8GB, particularly the yellows reds and pinks. Also worth noting is that it seems there’s less noise in the blue areas – a common problem the N95 suffers when taking photos that feature a lot of blue skies. There seems to be better contrast over all too.

Nokia N97

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Nokia N95 8GB

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James also tests out the resolution of the camera, and if you check out the full resultion [Nokia N97][Nokia N95 8GB] you’ll see that the N97 picks out slightly more detail, with lines looking more defined than on the N95 8GB.

n97 v 8

N95 8GB on the left, N97 on the right. Notice that the lines are clearer on the N97.

n97 8

N95 8GB on the top, N97 below - oddly the numbers and the splaying thicking fanned lines on the right looks sharper on the N95 8GB (bit of noise on the N97), even though the lines on the right appear sharper on the N97

Note below – the N97 seems to have very little or no barrel distortion. Much more obvious is that the N97 appears warmer whilst the N95 8GB appears to have a slight cool blue tinge.

Nokia N97

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Nokia N95 8GB

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James has uploaded original resolution photos of all these images to his flickr account >here<

via Nokia Creative

In his next post, James will be testing out a feature I’m excited yet dreading –  flash photography. We’ve seen the N97 produce some okay low light photos, but without flash here. It’s also worth noting the N82 sample pics under extreme low light at the bottom of that post with xenon flash.