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Posts Tagged ‘Camera’

Doubting how good the camera on the N8 is?

December 20, 2010 51 comments

 

Following on from Jay’s post on the N8 being used to shoot the cover of Pix magazine’s Dec-Jan issue, Steve Litchfield shared a video made by a normal user like us using the N8’s camera. My initial impression was wow, followed immediately by a feeling of being duped, then amazement when I realized that this might actually be real.

 

Watch in HD on Vimeo for best quality, you’d being doing yourself a disservice otherwise.

Read more…

Categories: Nokia, Nseries, Video Tags: ,

Video: Nokia N8 Replaces DSLR for Pix Magazine Dec-Jan Front Cover shoot

December 20, 2010 21 comments

So here’s the Nokia N8 again taking on some professional work: Replacing a DSLR for a magazine shoot!

There’s a 9 minute video accompanying this post that shows the entire process:

  • Initial worries about the N8 << but they go on to say it’s not the equipment, it’s the technique. But it still has to be good.
  • How to attach a screw-less Nokia N8 to a tripod?
  • Right lighting is key for ANY camera – some tips for N8 users we’ve received from the Nokia N8 Camera school
  • Helps to have a really fit model. It’s hard to take a bad photo this way 😛

Result – fear over – “they look fantastic!”amazed at the details on the lashes, “It’s a cellphone!!!!”

“The camera pulled it off”…”camera?” …”the phone pulled it off!”

Read more…

Categories: Nokia, Nseries, Symbian, Video Tags: , , , ,

Video: Pitch Black video recording with Nokia N8 and a Ring Light

December 6, 2010 5 comments

Camera Guru extraordinaire Jan van der Meer has another great tip for N8 users (well all camera phone users in general).

For extreme low light the Nokia N8 has a Xenon Flash. But what about video? There’s no LED light, and even if it was there they’re almost usually pants for anything other than shooting macro video (unless of course you’ve got a big sensor to assist in capturing in low light) e.g. N86

Jan’s tip for the N8 is to use Ring Light.  As you can guess it’s a ring of lights. These cost a few bucks and in Jan’s own words provide “enough light to enlighten your whole house”. Well, maybe. :p.

Another great tip is how Jan attaches the light ring. With VELCRO Perhaps not something you’d leave on your N8 but if you have a film project this would be very useful. Jan says you can even attach additional lenses to the light ring too. The whole velcro thing has many possibilities of what to attach to the N8 and what the N8 could attach to, no?

Read more…

Categories: Nokia, Nseries, Symbian, Video Tags: , , , ,

Damien Dinning Dispels the myth and misconceptions behind Full Focus cameras #C7 #E7

November 23, 2010 6 comments

[See C7 gallery]

Nokia’s Damien Dinning, Imaging wizard, has written a comprehensive post about Nokia’s Full Focus camera to educate and dispel about the myths and misconceptions about cameras without autofocus (as seen in slim E7 and C7  – C6-01 too though slimness debatable).

Full focus – low tech – v – simple? “it could be easily argued that Full Focus cameras are in fact more complex than autofocus cameras”

Benefits of Full Focus Camera?

  1. With a Nokia Full Focus camera you can simply grab moments without the fear of images or videos ever being out of focus for subjects from around 50cm through to infinity, regardless of lighting conditions or subject position in the frame etc.
  2. No shooting lag waiting for autofocus. Despite the Nokia N8 featuring the fastest autofocus of any mobile at just 350ms (average), it’s still a delay.
  3. Everything from approximately 50cm to infinity in the same picture/video appears in focus. Hence the name ‘Full Focus’ cameras. Conventional cameras have Read more…
Categories: Nokia Tags: , , , , , , ,

Video: Nokia N8 Camera/Film School – Hollywood Lighting tips

October 30, 2010 1 comment

Latest in the series – something often overlooked though being rather crucial – lighting.

  • Really great tip: Set N8 Video to black and white – not for recording but optimising the light source. This is so you won’t get distracted by the colours.
  • 3 point lighting – backlight, keylight and fill light. This is what makes these video blogs much more professional looking than your standard in-room lighting.

NokiaConversations

Previous videos

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Photos: New 12MP samples from the Nokia N8 (4000×3000)

July 19, 2010 23 comments

Looks like ricardore uploaded some new pictures. Here’s some samples below. Some are out of focus unfortunately. The rest of the pictures are on his Nokia N8 set. Remember this is taken with a Nokia N8 prototype.


via: Taken and uploaded on flickr by ricardore

Story of the Nokia N8’s incredible camera (Superb Butterfly shot :o so much detail!!)

July 8, 2010 13 comments

Detailed crop, N8 on the right. Natural, colours, much more detail than the competition - LOOK AT THOSE STONES!

Since the 7650 I’ve been hooked on mobile phone photography. I remember at the time my Dad said, that’s just a gimmick. My mum said it wouldn’t catch on. From the 7610, to Nseries and the Carl Zeiss partnership, Nokia has been pushing imaging to not just being a camera phone but a phone equipped with a fantastic camera, which with the N8 kills the compact camera alternative. You saw this yesterday with those stunning 9MP samples.

This article on Nokia Conversations by Damien Dinning, Imaging Legend at Nokia, exudes Nokia’s passion for perfection on mobile imaging, pushing to the highest quality, NATURAL looking photos. Nokia wants the N8 to produce images that are almost as real as your eye saw them, WITHOUT those ARTIFICIAL enhancements digital cameras implement to FOOL you into thinking images are better than what the camera is capable of.

Click here for part 1.

Now check out this photo below. Full 12mp, 4000×3000, ISO 100, Exposure 1/397.

This picture looks incredible. And it was taken over a month ago still with preproduction firmware/hardware!

Cropping it – look at all that detail! It’s overwhelming! And it’s from a PHONE! (note, converted, will look even better on the original!)

Crop again:

This is real 12mp, each pixel is usable. Whilst some may not make huge prints, Steve Jobs would say the ability to maintain the detail when cropping and getting closer to your image is PHENOMENAL.

Categories: Nokia, Nseries, Symbian Tags: , , , , ,

Video: Nokia N900 Camera Interface – why it’s better than what’s on the N97

December 15, 2009 13 comments

Like much of Nokia’s line up, the Nokia N900 has a 5MP camera with dual LED flash. What sets it slightly apart from all the rest is the revamped camera controls, minimising the need for necessary button presses that Nokia’s put us through before.

I’ve talked about what I love in the N900’s camera, shown some samples and screenshots but now, let me demonstrate in video

  • Simple selection of modes
  • New icon indicator appears after adjusting a setting (e.g. ISO 100), from which you can press that new icon and adjust that setting from there
  • Remembering your last saved settings. – If you’re taking photos in a particular area and just took a short break in between shots, you don’t want to have to set those settings again should you decide to close the lens cover
  • Start up is fast, time between next shot is about 1-2 seconds.
  • Autofocus is fast and accurate
  • Nice to have the option of 16:9 photos to maximise view finder when taking photos.

With a touch screen, you’ve got a blank canvas of controls, with limitless possibilities of how many buttons and where to position them. On the N97 it doesn’t take advantage of this. It’s not necessarily an S60V5 issue as the same OS on the Samsung i8910 and Sony Ericsson Satio don’t have the camera interface.

This is somewhat addressed on the N900.

It’s not completely perfect (there could be an additional “button” to switch from camera/video, making it just a one click switch), but these slightly revamped controls make the N900’s camera a joy to use. In future though, I would like to see some of the N97’s imaging options available on the N900:

  • Colour Tones – Black and white/Sepia/Vivid
  • Contrast
  • Camera Grid – helps compose photo
  • Sequence mode – Bust shot (I’d also like the old sequence mode where you can set phone to take photos in longer intervals, 1s, 5s, 10, 30s, 1m, 5m – a niche feature but great for time lapse photography)
  • Self Timer – don’t leave people out in group photos
  • User defined settings – I like to save high contrast/high exposure/black and wide in the N97, and it’s nice that I can select this mode and not have to tinker about with these settings (not that the N900 has these options anyway)

That’s about it for now. I won’trant on new physical features I’d like to see in the next MaemoPhone today. Though, this post more or less sums it up:

making-a-real-nokia-flagship-from-existing-nokia-devices/

Oh ok. One thing. The camera shutter-release button – great to have one, but now I’m preferring the more obvious 2 step press in the N97’s button. [that and of course Xenon – sorry, sorry, I couldn’t help myself!)

Nokia N900 – Photo Samples and Maemo5 camera UI – London Part 2

December 2, 2009 2 comments

Here is the remaining photos from my weekend in London.[part 1]

The N900 has a 5mp camera – 4:3 ratio at 2576×1936. It also takes widescreen 16:9 images at 2576×1488 (3.5MP).

Although 5MP is higher detail, I prefer the framing of the 16:9 photos. They look better when viewing on the N900 and on the computer.

The N900 is a great little point and shoot. It has much of the image options of previous Nseries, and whilst it’s missing a few, you really don’t need them. Practically all of these photos are set in Auto.

What I love about the N900 camera:

  • the great photo quality -5/3.5MP, Carl Zeiss Optics
  • Fast Start < 1 second
  • fast autofocus
  • the revamped camera UI. Not only is it easier to navigate, but if you were to tweak some settings and exit the Camera, opening the camera brings you back to those exact settings, so no fiddling about all over again and possibly missing the shot. Everything is easily just two clicks away, where they take double if not longer with S60V5’s camera UI.

Camera UI

    • *Ready to shoot
  • Settings > Macro > Done*
  • Settings > Video > Done
  • Settings > Photo > Done

There’s no insane double tapping to confirm your settings like with s60v5 camera UI. The N900’s camera UI takes much better advantage of having a touch screen with its camera interface, though there’s still room for improvement, such as simple having a dedicated button to switch from video/photo

  • Photo > Done
  • Video > Done

Now the photo samples:

There’s a mixture of lighting scenes, indoor, cloudy, sunny, low light. Under sufficient lighting the N900 is absolutely superb. In low lighting, it can get a bit testing. To save battery, I turned the screen down to the lowest, which did make framing subjects a little harder. I didn’t use the Flash much (or at all).

Frankly, N900’s flash doesn’t help that much and unless it delivers the natural lighting of the N86 or the xenon illumination of the N82. The  N900’s images look better without additional “help” from the dual LED.

Orchids at reception

Great view from the Hotel of Tower Bridge

Something of Wales in London

Statue of a Builder

Iconic London Double Decker

Trafalgar Square Fountain

Lions

Harrods Bus of Bears

Tin Man

Morning View

Phone Box. Right of this photo is where I saw Lily Allen

Ceramic Mini Animals

Bugs

Metal people

The only photo I got of the London Eye this time….is a painting

Face Cast

Fandango Classical Group

Nokia N900 – Can you do the Fandango? Photo and Video Samples – London – Part 1

November 29, 2009 5 comments

Just got back from London, and after an extremely eventful weekend I am minutes from crashing into my bed for a well deserved snooze fest.

I’ll leave you with a quick [indoor] camera/video sample at Covent Garden of a group called “Fandango”, just to demonstrate the video recording quality/audio quality as well as photo quality when using the N900 as a simple point and shoot (as opposed to rigorously testing out the camera with specified fields).

I was actually just trying to take a photo of the Christmas Decor, and when I moved to get a better view I saw and heard this aawesome, fun and lively classical group playing to a huge audience.

Although I do miss the xenon flash and extensive camera settings of previous Nseries devices, I do love the redefined camera menu that’s just so simple to use. Switching between macro/auto/landscape and photo/video was as easy as it should have first appeared with S60 touch. The camera also remembers the last mode you were in…i.e. if you last set the camera to landscape, if you exit and restart the camera, you’ll head back to landscape – no fiddling with settings if all you did was to close the camera app in between some snaps.

Macro mode not on, but N900 able to autofocus and capture in pretty much clear detail.

  • Video – Fandango 1 –
  • 02:41
  • 67.7MB
  • Video 2
  • 06:01
  • 146MB
  • Video 3
  • 03:15
  • 83.8MB

Note: There are supposed to be three videos in this post – however, YouTube is taking some time to process these raw files direct from the N900. :s youtube is being buggy with all of my uploads today. Will reupload in a mo.

  • Audio, as usual, is of very high quality on the Nseries line.
  • What was interesting with the video was that as Hannah kept on calling to find out where I was, the N900 did not cut and stop the video recording like the N97 (very annoying), it carried on filming.
  • Although there’s some motion distortion whilst panning, I do have to add that there are some additional inflicted jitteriness due to me being absolutely freezing to the core as I decided to wear shorts again (I think I’m turning out to be a glutten for some cold punishment). Long story short, jeans were absolutely soaking from a long walk in the rain.
  • Since the N900 has autofocus capability in the video, your subject must remain pretty much in the same range you first set the focus level to (as N900 does not yet have continuous autofocus). This means that if you may inadvertently get the focus level wrong, or the subject might move much closer or further away, then your video may get blurry.